Meet The Author

Meet The Author: Interview with Terri Bolds

Terri Bolds is a Licensed Therapist, Author, member of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc, Public Speaker and the Creator of Bold Visions Consulting; a business created to educate the community on mental health, emphasizing on self-esteem and self-empowerment.

Receiving a BA in Psychology and Masters in 2006 from Wright State University; she worked as a therapist for a short period of time before taking positions as an Associate Professor, Mental Health Specialist and substitute teacher over the years.

In 2015, Terri founded her business Bold Visions Consulting focusing on esteem, and empowerment as if she were addressing her younger self. With Bold Visions, Terri has been able to conduct and facilitate workshops, speak and educate on mental health in schools and churches with youth participants; and have been featured in printed publications.

Having a passion for writing, Terri released her first self-published booked “Bold Love-A Letter To My Young Sister in 2016, and Bold Choices-They Say Im Bad to follow summer of 2017 and Bold Me I AM Worthy in 2018

In partnership with Cincinnati Public Schools, businesses, churches, etc, she is helping implement the importance of mental wellness and practices of anti- bullying, not only by teaching and literature but also using visuals, interactive activities and experiences.

With more to come, Terri will continue to empower and encourage by traveling and speaking to the masses about the importance of mental health and wellness.

Get to Know the Author:

What inspires you?
Life. I am inspired by life and everything it encompasses.
Where did the idea come from for this book?
My life experiences and just over time I wanted to expand my brand and after releasing my children’s books, and felt it was time to speak to a different audience.
How long have you been writing?
I have been writing since I was a child.
How do you use your books with your business?
My books are an extension or bonus to what I speak about.
Do you plan on writing more books?
Yes, definitely.
What will be your next literary release?
My goal is to release a fiction book for middle school.
How do you want to be remembered?
A child of God living a life to serve and assist others.

Bold Self-Reflection; Know Thyself will take the reader on a journey down a path of uncovering hard truths. The pages are filled with creative and realistic ways to help the reader uncover the deceptions they subconsciously and consciously live with and learn how they have affected their lives. Through the journey of self-exploration, the reader will also begin to lay down a foundation of truth-telling that will begin to shift their path on a direction of freedom from of unwanted baggage.

 

Read the Excerpt Now: 

 

Many times, people walk around, living their lives, not knowing why or how they ended up the way they are. Have you ever met someone whose complaining is endless, whose unhappiness for others is never-ending, who’s in constant failed relationships, or just can’t seem to get it right? There is a reason behind that person’s behaviors and attitudes. When we see a person, we see the physical shell, but don’t consider that we are also meeting their past, hurts, trauma, ups, downs, joys, and pains. As a therapist, I look beyond the shell. My focus is from a cognitive-behavioral approach. I want people to understand how their thoughts, feelings, behaviors, and outcomes are all connected.

Book Features

#BookTour #SneakPeek My Last Baggage Call Aboard air Force One by Glenn W. Powell

               

           Meet Glenn 

 
Sergeant First Class Glenn W. Powell (Retired) is a native of Toledo, Ohio. He enlisted into the United States Army in 1982 and retired in 2002. During his military career, he served as a heavy vehicle driver, a squad leader, and non-commissioned officer.
In September 1991, SFC Powell joined the George HW Bush White House as a chauffeur, and in 1992, was promoted to transportation coordinator for the white house Press Corps, serving in the Clinton Administration.
In December 1995, he assumed the duties of transportation supervisor for Air Force One.
In January 2001, during his service under President George W. Bush, SFC Powell was transferred to the White House Military Office, Customer Support and Organizational Development where he served as deputy director.
SFC Powell retired with distinction from the Military in 2002. He received numerous awards and decorations throughout his service, including the Legion of Merit Metal, Meritorious Service Medal, the Joint Service Achievement Medal, and the United States Army Achievement Medal with four oak leaf clusters. He received U.S. Service Ribbons for both domestic and overseas service.
Glenn and Ronda Holloway Powell have been married for 25 years, and have three sons, Darius, Warren, and Glenn, II. They reside in Virginia. For more information, or to contact Glenn Powell regarding availability for speaking opportunities, please email him at glennwpowell@aol.com.
 
 
              About The Book
 
Sergeant Glenn W. Powell’s MY LAST BAGGAGE CALL is the story of a most unlikely young man who leaves his working-class environment of Toledo, Ohio, to become a soldier. Seeking excitement and a way to “make something of himself,” Glenn Powell’s journey exceeds his wildest dreams—a journey that began in basic training in Fort Hood, Texas ends at 1600 Pennsylvania avenue—the most important address in the world. MY LAST BAGGAGE CALL is about so much more than Glenn Powell’s military journey, but about poignant memories of family, friendships, sacrifices, and love—central to his story is Ronda Holloway, the beautiful young woman he falls in love with in Manheim, Germany, and, who joins him on his life journey as wife, soulmate and mother to their two sons. MY LAST BAGGAGE CALL offers readers a glimpse into Sergeant Glenn Powell’s 30-year transformation from the much-beloved boy who seeks more in life…to the man, who discovers it—in adventure, in friendships, and in service to three American presidents. a service he delivered with pride, unquestioned loyalty, distinction and in the end, great admiration.
 
 
Excerpt
 
A Soldier’s Story 
Shortly after I turned 18, I enlisted in the army. Around that time, I learned that the young woman I’d been dating was pregnant, so going into the army would be an opportunity to provide for my child. The army sent me to Fort Dix in New Jersey for boot camp training on April 22, 1982. It was the perfect enlistment site for me.
Because of the popular television show, Dallas, I had in mind that I wanted to go to Fort Hood, Texas and meet JR Ewing. Not only did I meet Larry Hagman, the actor who played JR, but I also met the entire cast at one of the big Dallas malls. That was in the 80s when the networks spent money to have cast members show up to greet their fans, and when fans could easily get a photo with the stars. Meeting JR had been on my mental bucket list. Later I learned that “Klinger” from Mash and Danny Thomas were both from Toledo, and so I added them to the list.
In 1983, I re-enlisted and chose Hawaii as my next army stint. There for 18 months, I’m convinced that the Hawaii move helped me look long and hard at myself and my future. In Hawaii, I decided I needed to better myself. I enrolled at the Wahiawa Community School for Adults and got my high school diploma. My mother was so disappointed when I didn’t graduate from high school, so I did it as much for her as for myself.
My long transportation management career began in Wahiawa. I was one of a large number of applicants who applied for a temporary mission of driving for the Sergeant Major for the division. He was the senior enlisted man at the post. I beat out the other candidates for that position. Later, I drove for the one-star general at the post. After that, I returned to my unit and worked as the battalion mail clerk until he left in 1985. While there, I met friends and mentors who would help me decide on my career journey. That same year, I was asked to re-enlist, and First Sergeant Herbert Harris became a lifelong mentor and friend. Sergeant Harris recommended that I choose Fort Eustis in Newport News, Virginia for my re-enlistment. I remained at Fort Eustis from April 1985 until January 1988.
I became a squad leader, and for the next six months, I managed a squad of truck drivers in and around the base. After that, I was set on transportation becoming my specialty, but my career trajectory changed some when I was appointed to head up NCO Training, where I was responsible for the training of 270 soldiers.
Around this time, I met First Sergeant Fletcher Walker. He was sent in to straighten out our company, and he did just that. He would stand up at the top of the stairs with his hat covering his eyes but looking down at us. Sergeant Walker was a ‘soldier among soldiers,’ an airborne paratrooper, a Vietnam Veteran who had been shot three times. There was no one more surprised when he chose me to run the training.
I knew he had high expectations, and I was determined not to disappoint him. He was the kind of leaders for whom soldiers would fight and die. He was a true hero who taught me how to be a soldier and a man. He shared a lot about life with me. I imitated him in many ways so much that everyone would call me “Baby Walker.” I met his family and it was an honor. He retired as a Command Sergeant Major.
 
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Book Features

#BookSpotlight Falling Through The Ceiling by Audrey and Larry Jones

Audrey Robinson Jones left Kansas to attend Wellesley College, graduating in 1972 with her degree in anthropology/sociology, planning to be a social worker. Instead, she worked in healthcare administration for almost 30 years with her husband, including running his multi-office pediatric practice for 24 years. She also earned master’s degrees in healthcare administration and business.

She became managing partner of an airport concessions company and purchased two business franchises with her sons. At the same time, she and her husband built a loving home with three sons. As life unfolded, her sons and husband were diagnosed with ADHD. Managing businesses and four ADHD males took its toll on her health.

In 2008, Audrey was stricken with an almost fatal autoimmune disease. Recovering and retired, Audrey remains a vital force, including participating with Larry in several international health missions trips. At home, she continues to lead a local food pantry, something she’s done for over fifteen years, in addition to family advocacy activities.

Larry Albert Jones, MD, grew up in the 1950s with an overprotective mother and grandmother in a poor section of Memphis, Tenn. His childhood was greatly impacted by the village of educators and church folks who recognized his intellect. That village launched Larry to Wesleyan University, Johns Hopkins University and The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Unfortunately, he lost his mother to cancer before his 20th birthday, but his path was set. He began to notice how much time he required to maintain his college GPA as he prepared for medical school. Keeping his eye on the prize, he persevered, never considering that he would later be diagnosed with ADHD.

For at least 20 years of his career as a pediatrician and parent, he did not link his children’s symptoms and signs of ADHD to himself. While being an effective and popular clinician, he lived in denial about his own diagnosis. Larry is currently a departmental medical director for the SSM Healthcare System. With treatment and counseling, Larry is pursuing community projects, including facilitating a STEM program with elementary school students in Ferguson, MO.

The memoir of Audrey and Larry Jones and their three sons demystifies ADHD in childhood and beyond.

A blend of love, humor and real-life irony, Falling Through the Ceiling makes sense of the nonsensical, shedding light on the challenges of living with attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD). These stories offer the real-deal reality of living with a house full of ADHD, including the ups, downs and chaos of what happened and the consequences of such. The authors, a married couple of 45 years, offer experience, practical insight and what they learned from counselors, research and their own mistakes to assist people coping with children and adults who are affected by ADHD.

Sharing their personal life challenges with the effects of ADHD, this is a real, sometimes painful, story written to help families recognize and navigate to controlling chaos and unlocking the gifts of ADHD in their children and themselves.

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Monday, February 11

Guest Post at Lighthouse Academy

Monday, February 11

Book Spotlight at Queenie’s BookTalk and Reviews

Wednesday, February 13

Interview at Nothing But Books

Friday, February 15

Book Spotlight Authors & Readers Book Corner

Book Spotlight at Hope. Dreams. Life. Love

Interview at A Diva’s Heart

Bookish News

April Wrap Up

I read a variety of books in the month of April. The majority were review books that were releasing in the month. My taste for reading has been changing and now I’m really interested in paranormal and fantasy. This surprises me but not be if you notice more of these books in my to-be-read or wrap ups. Let me share the books I completed for this month.

I enjoyed learning more about the Jones family in the second book of the Sullivan’s Crossing series. I did loose track of some of the characters but overall it is a nice story. It does make me want to visit Sullivan’s Crossing because it seems like an ideal places to disappear. Check out my full review for my additional thoughts here.

The Ross’s have to give up on appearances once their daughter, Zoe attends a party. This was a great story for teenagers to learn their actions have consequences and affects everyone in their family. Check out my full review for my additional thoughts here.

In this 2nd book in the Parker Crime series the stakes go up when Abrianna is framed for murder. The action is ongoing and so is the twists and turns.

Teenagers and their secrets get out of hand in this book. The mystery kept me on my toes and the suspense made it an enjoyable ride.

Keke Palmer shares a lot about herself and what she has been through in this entertaining memoir. She is talented and a woman who knows who she is and has the confidence to show it. I loved the way the book was designed and laid out.

The second book in the Spellshadow Manor is even more enjoyable. The characters get into more trouble and more secrets are revealed. I had to get the next book in the series.

This is a wonderful book about a boy named Sam, who is different because of his red eyes. Sam goes through a lot of bullying and people not excepting him. They even call him awful names, but he doesn’t let it change the good hearted person he is.  This is a beautifully written story. Check out my full review for my additional thoughts here.

 

These are my reads for the month of April. Let me know in the comments what books you read in April. I would to add some to my to-be-read list.